Procrastination Files

A daily dose of inspiration, nonsense, or whatever the heck I feel like posting

The Best Thing I’ve Seen Today: Jamie Livingston’s Eighteen Years of a Daily Photo

Today’s inspiration comes from Jamie Livingston: A simple website of every photo taken shows the happy and mundane sides of his life, but the photos of his last year are particularly poignant as he quickly goes from brain surgery, to marriage, to death at age 41. Livingston was a filmmaker and appeared to live in or near Greenwich Village. He captured some of the newsworthy items of this time via snapshots of the television screen or newspaper headlines (e.g., invasion of Kuwait, O.J. Simpson verdict, Reagan-Carter debates), but the real beauty of the collection is the small glimpse into his view of life.

After Livingston’s death, his friends Hugh Crawford and Betsy Reid put together a public exhibit and website using the photos and called it PHOTO OF THE DAY: 1979-1997, 6,697 Polaroids, dated in sequence. The physical exhibit opened in 2007 at the Bertelsmann Campus Center at Bard College (where Livingston started the series, as a student, way back when). The exhibit included rephotographs of every Polaroid and took up a 7 x 120 foot space (via The Quotidian Diary, and Mental Floss).
Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 8.09.18 PM
Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 8.08.17 PM Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 8.08.54 PM Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 8.10.13 PM Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 8.11.52 PM Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 8.12.13 PM Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 8.12.39 PM Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 8.14.25 PM Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 8.14.57 PM Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 8.15.16 PM 07-02-89_std1 10-07-97_std1

Advertisements

The Best Thing I’ve Seen Today: Marzena Skubatz’s 24 Hours

A few days ago, I featured a post off of iGNANT (my newest favorite blog). While perusing the site a bit more this morning, I came across their “24 Hours” series. It highlights a-day-in-the-life of sorts of some of their favorite photographers. Aside from the stunning photography, what really makes the series vivid (to me) is how it captures the beauty of any given day. Yes, there’s something inherently interesting about glimpses into international cultures, but its the “everyday”-ness that makes these shine. Check them all out, but here’s a look at Marzena Skubatz’s contribution:

Image

ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

 

The Best Thing I’ve Seen Today: Valentine’s ‘This American Life’ Google Doodle

Hearts out to Ira Glass, This American Life, and Google. 

ImageImageImage

The Best Thing I’ve Seen Today: Organized Wonder

Organized Wonder is a way to share and discover the best talks, documentaries, interviews, short films and various other videos scattered across the web. Follow people you admire and share your wonders with others.”  

From what I’ve seen of this site so far, it’s an incredibly well-curated selection of videos. May I recommend Ethan Marcotte’s “The Map is Not the Territory“.

Image

 

Image

The Best Thing I’ve Seen Today: Adam Kaplan’s “GRID A simple guide to responsive design”

This is as lovely as it is useful. View.Image

 

The Best Thing I’ve Seen Today: Elephant Rose by Jean-Baptiste Courtier

“If someone tells you not to think of a pink elephant, you immediately see a pink elephant in your mind’s eye, right? PhotographerJean-Baptiste Courtier took this little perceptional trick to create his series ‘Elephant Rose’. We see a humongous, inflatable pink elephant following a young woman on her heels. Not sure if it’s just a dream or a surreal scene, we get confused by the pink animal that won’t really fit into the surrounding. The woman doesn’t even seem to apperceive the elephant which might be the embodiment of a constant thought that’s haunting her. We just recently introduced French photographer Jean-Baptiste Courtier with his series ‘Natation Synchronisée’ and are curious for more to come.” (via ignant.de)

ImageImageImageImageImageImage

The Best Thing I’ve Seen Today: “Badass Lady Creatives” and DWL Textile Designers

The idea is simple: creative communities benefit from diversity, but there is a notable lack of women (for starters) featured on speaker panels, in leadership positions, and even in our daily blog feeds. Badass Lady Creatives features talented female professionals who deserve to be recognized for their work, because good things come from getting the work out there.

Image

Image

It’s a joyously wonderful site to spend an afternoon exploring.  I happened upon it through a DesignWorkLife post featuring 5 textile designers. (Bonus- I’ve included some highlights from that article, too!)

– – –

“Helen Dealtry is Woking Girl Designs, a Brooklyn-based textile design studio; she partners with clients and sells her own line of products. Helen lends notable warmth to geometric designs, but her more classically “feminine” work (florals) has a bold charm to it, as well.” (via DWL)

Image

Image

– – –

Laura Slater prints her designs by hand. Her work is refreshing because it does not rely on pattern for impact, but rather demonstrates an experimental approach. Laura’s process page is a real treat. (via DWL)

Image

– – –

Miki Fukuyama is the powerhouse behind Makumo textiles; her online shop features a full bounty of products in her graphic, illustrative style. This Fukuoka, Japan-based designer screenprints her textiles by hand, a process which reveals itself in her layered aesthetic. (via DWL)

Image

– – –

Mónica Muñoz is the Spanish designer behind the Moniquilla brand; her patterns appear on garments, accessories, stationery, and house wares (shop here). Mónica experiments with a range of styles, but her floaty watercolors are among her best work. (via DWL)

Image

Image